Merry Christmas Folks!

Climbing Back Onboard After Falling In

Any security or safety issues regarding the Broads waterways.
Obstacles, vandalism, thefts, trees down etc.
Post Reply
User avatar
Dances With Otters
Site Admin
Posts: 1668
Joined: May 10th, 2017, 7:57 pm
Location: Earth
Contact:

Climbing Back Onboard After Falling In

Post by Dances With Otters » July 20th, 2018, 7:57 pm

In my very first year on the Norfolk Broads, I rescued a capsized canoe on Sutton Broad.
For love or money, I could not pull her on to my boat and neither could another boat that passed.
A bit scary when you think about it, as just how many folks could actually get back on to their boats after losing an argument with gravity.
Even worse if it's is cold, or after a few cold ones.
The fact of the matter is that if you can not get back into your boat from within the water? Then you are putting yourself at grave risk.
Furthermore, if you can't get back onboard, others most likely can't either.
If you think you can pull a fully dressed person onboard too? Think again?
Play it safe and invest in one of these discreet and potentially lifesaving emergency boat ladders.
For less than £30, it would be rude to say no

CLICK HERE FOR EMERGENCY SAFETY LADDER SOLD BY AMAZON
⛵ Life is short, even on its longest day ⛵

JohnS
Posts: 126
Joined: June 1st, 2017, 6:55 am

Re: Climbing Back Onboard After Falling In

Post by JohnS » July 21st, 2018, 7:13 am

My wife, Dawn fell in a few years ago at Ranworth Island when we were stern on mooring. We have no rails on the back of the boat to hold onto and the canapot was down so she couldn’t even hold onto that. There’s no way she was climbing up the side of our boat as it sits high in the water. Luckily the tide was high and the quay heading at Ranworth is low so she scrabbled up onto the bank.
Later we bought a ladder for the back of the boat, it was a 4 rung metal one bolted through the transom, unused until the other week and when I had a swim at Geldeston lock. Thought I’d take the opportunity to test it. Although the ladders lowest foot was under the water by a few inches it was incredibly hard to even get my foot in it! Not to mention as there’s no hand rail higher than the transom coupled with the fact the ladder is close to the transom(about 100mm clearance) made it really difficult to climb also.
I’d definitely say everyone needs to have a rescue plan, and more importantly test it! Or like me you’ll be sailing around thinking you’re covered but in reality your access is not as good as you think

User avatar
Dances With Otters
Site Admin
Posts: 1668
Joined: May 10th, 2017, 7:57 pm
Location: Earth
Contact:

Re: Climbing Back Onboard After Falling In

Post by Dances With Otters » July 21st, 2018, 7:33 am

Now imagine trying to do that at sea, or rescuing a person, or dog.
⛵ Life is short, even on its longest day ⛵

User avatar
David
Posts: 146
Joined: June 3rd, 2017, 8:33 am

Re: Climbing Back Onboard After Falling In

Post by David » July 21st, 2018, 11:47 am

I fell in at Stalham when attempting to remove my outboard off my dingy our boat does have a boarding ladder on the transum but the bottom rung only just touches the water it was impossible to climbe on to the ladder with my inflated life jacket on I was also very tired after holding on to the out board which I managed to get on to our mooring, the only way I got back on board was to remove my life jacket and get my wife to drop down one of our boats mooring lines and cleated it off to make a foot loop which dropped down into the water bellow the rung of the ladder and I got back on the boat that way
A boat makes a big hole in the water in to which you throw money

JohnS
Posts: 126
Joined: June 1st, 2017, 6:55 am

Re: Climbing Back Onboard After Falling In

Post by JohnS » July 22nd, 2018, 8:46 am

Im glad it’s bit just me David, it’s really is tricky in a real life situation without a proper foot hold below the transom. I’ve been looking at other boats out this weekend, and most boats ladders I’ve seen when folded out will only just about touch the water.
This is a worthy question indeed to raise Miles 👍 I hope other people take a look at their ladders and jump in to test them in a safe place while the weather is warm

User avatar
Dances With Otters
Site Admin
Posts: 1668
Joined: May 10th, 2017, 7:57 pm
Location: Earth
Contact:

Re: Climbing Back Onboard After Falling In

Post by Dances With Otters » July 22nd, 2018, 10:24 am

It happens to us all. I was only just chatting to a fellow who must be in his 70's and he himself went for a splash just from kicking his cleat..
People should not rely on climbing out on a bank as that is easier said then done and may result in getting trapped.
People must also realise that the first reaction for the person on the boat is to whack it in reverse too but that will suck you towards the boat.
I agree on the stainless ladders, as you got to get on the bloody thing first of all in most cases.
This time of the year, you have time but in the cold water out of season, I'd say you could get in trouble pretty quickly.
⛵ Life is short, even on its longest day ⛵

Post Reply