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The Vikings & East Anglia

Little known and interesting Norfolk Broads nautical and marine forum topics.
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Miles
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The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by Miles »

(Image: Jakub T. Jankiewicz/Flickr.com)
(Image: Jakub T. Jankiewicz/Flickr.com)
and the same year came a large heathen army into England, and fixed their winter-quarters in East-Anglia, where they were soon horsed; and the inhabitants made peace with them.
- 'The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles', written by monks between 871 and 899.

In 840 AD, ‘The Great Heathen Army’ or Vikings landed on these lands before heading off further to settle in the rest of East Anglia, creating havoc in their path.

They attacked existing settlements along the River Yare before traversing the River Wensum to attack the local fortified areas.
daneslongboat.jpg
daneslongboat.jpg (6.65 KiB) Viewed 1779 times
After killing the East Anglian King Edmund and much, later on, burning what is now the city of Norwich, the violence and destruction ended and they quite simply settled down and became farmers... as you do.
danes5.jpg
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After their initial arrival on the shores of Norfolk, the predominant focus was the usual Viking interest - gold, silver and slaves.

In the years 864-5, a Viking army wintered at Thetford in Norfolk. It was here that the Vikings began a campaign of conquest across Anglo-Saxon England.
king edmund.jpg
king edmund.jpg (17.35 KiB) Viewed 1779 times
Edmund was the King of East Anglia (consisting of the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk).

Attempts to make peace with the Danish Vikings and their leader Ivar the Boneless, they were confronted in battle at Hoxne in Suffolk, in 869/70.
viking battle.jpg
viking battle.jpg (9.18 KiB) Viewed 1779 times
The Danish Vikings won the victory and the last East Anglian King was slaughtered.
The Vikings now had full control of the Kingdom of East Anglia.

King Edmund was later canonised and became a saint and is still honoured in Bury St Edmunds.

In years to follow monasteries were destroyed including St. Etheldreda’s monastery at Ely, Dummuc and Elmham, towns and villages.

This reign of destruction was to come to an end during the reign of Alfred the Great, the first King of the English.
alfred the great.jpg
alfred the great.jpg (9.48 KiB) Viewed 1779 times
King Alfred raised an army against the Danish Viking army and their Viking King Guthrum.
After years of fighting, at the Treaty of Wedmore in 886, Viking King Guthrum agreed to convert to Christianity. He was baptised Athelstan and a dividing boundary was established, separating his land from that of King Alfred's.

This dividing boundary ran from the River Lea in Essex up to Bedford, then adjacent to the Ouse Valley. This district was known as the Danelaw.
danes2.jpg
danes2.jpg (10.23 KiB) Viewed 1779 times
To this day the settlements of the Danish Vikings can be perceived throughout the county of Norfolk through location names.

The name Flegg is a remnant of an Old Norse word Flaeg, a marsh plant that grows here still and is believed to be the marsh, Iris.
Almost all of the settlements here were names using words of Old Scandinavian derivation.

Thwaite (means a clearing in Old Norse),
Winterton (headland),
Toft Monks (dwelling),
Pockthorpes (fairy settlements),
The word staithe appears to be unique to Norfolk. It comes from the Old Norse word Stoth meaning “landing stage” for unloading boats.
These are all Viking settlement name examples.

As the story goes, the Vikings ultimately dropped their axes and battle shields and became peaceful farmers.
Integration appears to have been wholly successful. Eastern England became a melange of an Anglo-Scandinavian society.

Wessex eventually went on to conquer the Danelaw.

East Anglia went on to establish itself as a rich kingdom and Norwich become a very wealthy city.


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BEN
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by BEN »

The only error in the text I see is that the Word staithe is used all the way up to and including Northumberland.
Staithes were where coal was loaded into ships.
There is a village of Staithes in Yorkshire, once a major fishing port...


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CATFISH
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by CATFISH »

"mmmn,, Vikings"
lagertha-interview.jpg


"Here lies the body of Mary Lee; died at the age of a hundred and three. For fifteen years she kept her virginity; not a bad record for this vicinity."
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Miles
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by Miles »

Nowadays, you are best to do the old Crocodile Dundee test in advance as you just can't be too sure.
If you got it wrong just once? I am sure life would never be the same again.


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Miles
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by Miles »

BEN wrote: January 11th, 2022, 12:52 pm The only error in the text I see is that the Word staithe is used all the way up to and including Northumberland.
Staithes were where coal was loaded into ships.
There is a village of Staithes in Yorkshire, once a major fishing port...
That wouldn't surprise me at all.
In fact, I am surprised it isn't more common.
Thanks for sharing information.


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CATFISH
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by CATFISH »

Miles wrote: January 11th, 2022, 2:32 pm Nowadays, you are best to do the old Crocodile Dundee test in advance as you just can't be too sure.
If you got it wrong just once? I am sure life would never be the same again.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katheryn_Winnick
I'm pretty sure she has all the correct parts,, as for the "crocodile dundee test"

"Well I'm game if she is" ;)


"Here lies the body of Mary Lee; died at the age of a hundred and three. For fifteen years she kept her virginity; not a bad record for this vicinity."
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Miles
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by Miles »

Thank F£#& for byelaws. :D... apparently they are very effective.


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CATFISH
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by CATFISH »

There are many sources claiming the word "staithe" is unique to norfolk, I don't know why this should be so, as there are equally many staithes,, scattered all over the uk, I understood them to be "landing stages" used for unloading boats.

I supply just one link, in this case Martham, which clearly states norfolk exclusivity, but seems inaccurate when looked into further.
http://marthamnorfolk.co.uk/?page_id=9324

but it's still interesting apart from any small inaccuracies.


"Here lies the body of Mary Lee; died at the age of a hundred and three. For fifteen years she kept her virginity; not a bad record for this vicinity."
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Miles
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by Miles »

Interesting subject ain't it?
Better than listening to silly old farts complaining about being called a Tosspot.
At least, here, we learn, we share and to me that wins all day.


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CATFISH
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Re: The Vikings & East Anglia

Post by CATFISH »

Miles wrote: January 11th, 2022, 5:35 pm Interesting subject ain't it?
Better than listening to silly old farts complaining about being called a Tosspot.
At least, here, we learn, we share and to me that wins all day.
How true,,
strangely when at school I had next to no interest in history unless it was forced upon me, now I find much of it totally absorbing, especially the local stuff,.
maybe it's because now much older,, I'm actually part of it. :lol:


"Here lies the body of Mary Lee; died at the age of a hundred and three. For fifteen years she kept her virginity; not a bad record for this vicinity."
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