• Administrator

Barton Broad Anchor Mooring Buoys.

Norfolk Broads Forum - Any posts relating to the mooring of boats, whether you are looking to buy, rent or sell a Norfolk Broads boat mooring.
Post Reply
User avatar
Miles
Site Admin
Posts: 2345
Joined: May 10th, 2017, 7:57 pm
Location: Earth
Contact:

Barton Broad Anchor Mooring Buoys.

Post by Miles » June 26th, 2018, 8:25 am

Many may have noticed the mooring buoys on Barton Broad, and you may have also noticed sailing boats moored to them during the boating season.

How does this system work exactly?

Is Barton Broad a private broad/lake, or is it regarded as crown property?

Remember, that you have a right to navigate tidal waters but once the anchorage touches the bottom, then you are in fact trespassing.

Therefore, as these vessels are touching the river bed, are they doing so on private or public land?

I ask because I wonder what stops other boats from doing exactly the same thing?

Apart from needing a dinghy and a bouy mooring, does anyone know the ins and outs of this local system?
⛵ Norfolk Broads Forum now features a blog, classifieds & forum ⛵

BEN
Posts: 111
Joined: July 26th, 2017, 12:40 pm

Re: Barton Broad Anchor Mooring Buoys.

Post by BEN » June 26th, 2018, 11:00 am

You have a right to navigate natural waters, the Broads are man made, and therefore the rights to the bottom belong to someone. The right to navigation belongs to the river. I have read that at some point the river was diverted to go through Barton. Also of course there aquired rights of access to the staithes
IIRC Barton is split between between three parishes but who are the actual owners I don't know.
I don't believe anyone objects to mudweighting on the broad, however there probably is an owner to ask for permanent moorings.

User avatar
Miles
Site Admin
Posts: 2345
Joined: May 10th, 2017, 7:57 pm
Location: Earth
Contact:

Re: Barton Broad Anchor Mooring Buoys.

Post by Miles » June 26th, 2018, 11:50 am

I know Catfield is on one side but the others I am not sure.
It is an axiom that the now called Broads were in fact dug out on public land and being a long time ago, I can quite easily believe that.
Once the trees were felled, then the peat came and although it later diminished, many continued to do it up until surprisingly recent times.
I think in many cases a lot of landowners who own land around the Broads would have assumed they had rights to the broad itself, as I can not see how any one person would be able to trace land registry, or ownership back some thousand years.
Adverse possession may have been the modus operandi in the days, but it would be impossible to claim land through that method on a technical basis as the actual land itself is beneath the water.
The only proof someone can possibly demonstrate to owning a broad is to show documentary evidence that they did in fact own the land prior to it being quarried, if you like for peat, or even clay as in Hickling at Potter. :)
⛵ Norfolk Broads Forum now features a blog, classifieds & forum ⛵

BEN
Posts: 111
Joined: July 26th, 2017, 12:40 pm

Re: Barton Broad Anchor Mooring Buoys.

Post by BEN » June 26th, 2018, 2:47 pm

It would in many cases be able to prove ownership back till the doomsday book, certainly the land on which my house stands, was an anglo saxon I can't remember his name.. is in the doomsday book, soon after by Hugh Bigod, then eventually it came into the hands of Cambridge university after the dissolution of the monasteries.
It is highly likely most of the Broads came under St Bennets Abbey, as they had the rights of turbury over most of the broads (the right to dig peat). So that would mean they still belong to the church, unless the church sold them. The Bishop of Norwich is still the Abbot of St Bennets which was the only Abbey not dissolved by Henry...

Post Reply